Recently by Chris Mautner:

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Characters sweat a lot in Michael DeForge’s comics. Not the kind of flop sweat that traditional cartoon characters exhibit, with water droplets literally flying off the body in a halo formation, but beads of perspiration that cascade down the character’s face in such a plentiful supply that you sometimes wonder why there isn’t a puddle around the character’s feet.

What makes them sweat so much? Oh, you know, the usual. Your organs and flesh are slowly turning into leather and spikes. You had to join a secret mafia club in order to get your niece’s beloved clarinet. You’re an ant that’s overwhelmed by the meaningless of it all. You got infested with baby spiders because your weird kid brother insisted on wearing that dead horse head all the time. You’ve been consigned to a hell populated by beloved cartoon characters. You’re a hapless, divorced flying-squirrel dog trying to deal with your own inadequacies and two unruly kids. You’re desperately trying to fit in. You just killed someone. More… “Between Tree and Twig”

By day, Chris Mautner is the mild-mannered social media producer for PennLive.com. By night, he writes about really nerdy things for The Comics Journal … and this site. He is ¼ of the podcast Comic Books Are Burning in Hell.
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If you had any lingering suspicion that Dark Knight III: The Master Race — the second sequel to Frank Miller’s hugely popular and widely influential comic Batman: The Dark Knight Returns — was little more than a cynical cash grab on the part of publisher DC Comics, just direct your eyes to the credits on the inside front cover (they’re difficult to miss).

In addition to informing you that the story is by Frank Miller and Brian Azzarello and that Andy Kubert did the penciling, etc., there’s a sizable list of people that provided the art for what are known as “variant covers” — basically alternate exterior art slapped on the same comic that retailers can get only by ordering a ludicrous number of copies. It’s a cheap ploy designed to artificially goose sales by appealing to collectors’ mania and desperation. In this particular instance, I counted about 47 names on the list (more if you include collaborations). Even by industry standards it’s excessive. More… “Miller Lite”

By day, Chris Mautner is the mild-mannered social media producer for PennLive.com. By night, he writes about really nerdy things for The Comics Journal … and this site. He is ¼ of the podcast Comic Books Are Burning in Hell.
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