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…might be hard to find, even in the 21st century. At art auctions in 2014 and 2015, 92% of lots were by male artists. But at least women don’t need permission to paint fish — anymore. (Art News, The Smart Set)

Art takes many forms, and there is one arena of art that likely will never reach gender equality: beardistry. Throughout the beard’s hairy history, it has been a symbol of religious belief, masculinity, and power. For the women out there wishing they could dabble in this medium — my apologies. Blame evolution. (The Smart Set, New Republic)

The modern resurgence in tattoo art has ancient roots, and they lie with one 5000-year-old tatted-up Tyrolean Iceman. Modern art continues to throw this old form into new relief using a different breed of subject. (Smithsonian Science News, The Smart Set) •

Maren Larsen is the associate editor of The Smart Set. She is a digital journalism student, college radio DJ, and outdoor enthusiast.
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A pig sits in the middle of the hall. But is it just a pig? Millions like it are raised and slaughtered each year in countries around the world. And yet this pig is different. First of all, she has a name: Donata. Photos usually show her from behind, since this angle reveals the flames climbing up her spine. A snake slithers along her flank, winding its way past barbed wire, crucifixes, and red roses. And a “tramp stamp” composed of an eagle and an American flag spreads across her lower back. That’s right — Donata has tattoos. For a few weeks now, she has been on display at the MGK — Hamburg’s museum for fine and applied arts — as part of an exhibition on the cultural history of tattooing. Donata and other pigs like her are the work of Belgian artist Wim Delvoye, who achieved his initial breakthrough with Cloaca: an installation mimicking the human digestive process, down to a remarkably lifelike representation of the end product.
More… “Guinea Pig”

Bernd Brunner writes books and essays. His latest book (in German) is When Winters Were Still Winters: The History of a Season. His book Birdmania: Remarkable Lives with Birds will be published by Greystone Books in 2017. He is a fellow and nonfiction resident of the Carey Institute for Global Good in Rensselaerville, New York. His writing has appeared in Lapham’s Quarterly, The Paris Review Daily, AEON, TLS, Wall Street Journal Speakeasy, Cabinet, Huffington Post, Best American Travel Writing, and various German-language newspapers. Follow him on twitter at @BrunnerBernd.
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