The U.S. pharmaceutical industry spends billions each year to remind us that we’d be depressed, nauseous, headachey, and unable to have sex without their products. The U.S. alcohol industry pours billions into convincing us that a cold six-pack is a more precious and desirable commodity than a hot supermodel. In contrast, the U.S. medical marijuana industry mostly relies on stoned hypochondriacs to promote its wares via word of mouth. So far, that’s been an incredibly successful marketing strategy. But with hundreds of pot dispensaries both rolling in cash and looking to distinguish themselves in a crowded market, more of them are beginning to advertise. “Finally!” anti-marijuana advocates must be exclaiming around the country. “Some light at the end of the tunnel!”

 

For years, marijuana ads have been commonplace on TV. Between 1996 and 2006, the federal government More…

From a marketing perspective, the film is brilliant, something that Leo Burnett may have wished he came up with. The purpose of an advertisement is to ultimately convey the designer’s vision and serve as an extension of their collection. It also represents a philosophy — you can’t wear Versace and be a wallflower and you couldn’t possibly be a Marc Jacobs guy or girl and not like grunge. Taking his Chanel ideology one step further, Lagerfeld conceptualizes a scenario of beautiful night revelers, partying in fashionable garb in St. Tropez. In terms of content, it lacks the intellectual stimulation of a Godard film or the wit of a Coen brothers’ work. Its entertainment value rests in its aesthetic qualities — from the garments to the models — and its escapism element. After all, who wouldn’t find the glamorous (albeit clichéd) St. Tropez lifestyle appealing? While fashion enthusiasts rejoiced… More…