Renaissance men could barely keep up with all the exciting discoveries of their era, not least in the field of anatomy. Sixty years after Christopher set off for the New World, another Italian by the named of Renaldus Columbus (no relation) announced to his spellbound colleagues that he had finally discovered “the seat of a woman’s delight.” A lecturer in surgery at Padua University, this Columbus was part of a new wave of scholars that was exploring the inner-workings of the human body, mostly by dissecting cadavers. Obviously Columbus was also doing some field work: In 1559, he announced in his textbook De Re Anatomica that he had identified a female appendage that would “throb with brief contractions” during sexual intercourse, causing a woman’s “semen” to flow “swifter than air.” Columbus named his discovery amor Veneris, vul dulcedo,… More…