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There’s nothing the comics industry likes so much as licensed material. Why go to the trouble of coming up with your own ideas when there are so many established ones just begging to be displayed in some sort of visual sequence? The very first comic books, after all, were just a collection of repackaged newspaper comic strips.

The love for licensing is even stronger now that pop culture nostalgia has proven to be a ginormous money maker (see just about anything playing at your local cinema). Take a trip to the comics store and you’ll find scores of titles based off such properties as Jem and the Holograms, My Little Pony, Ghostbusters, Voltron, Power Rangers, Fraggle Rock, Robocop, and so much, much more.

Sometimes these comics are straight up garbage. Sometimes they are solid if uninspired adaptations that serve their purpose in evoking ever so slightly that je ne sais quoi that made fans cherish the source material. Occasionally (emphasis on “occasionally”) you get a cartoonist who offers a really interesting, delightful or spirited take on a familiar property (e.g. Carl Barks’ Donald Duck and John Stanley’s Little Lulu). More… “Bots that Go Boom”

By day, Chris Mautner is the mild-mannered social media producer for PennLive.com. By night, he writes about really nerdy things for The Comics Journal . . . and this site. He is one-quarter of the podcast Comic Books Are Burning in Hell.

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I sat on my tall stool behind the counter in my parents’ music store, looking past my open history textbook to the dirty snow and paper trash blowing down the street in the darkening afternoon. A lone figure shuffled down the opposite sidewalk, past the jewelry store, and stopped on the corner in front of the drug store at the stoplight, his helmeted head cast down, waiting for the traffic light to turn. I scanned a few more paragraphs in my textbook until he entered, heralded by a chorus of automated door chimes and blown in by a gust of frozen air.

“Hi, Louis,” I said. More… “The Ultimate Currency”

CJ Bartunek lives in Athens, Georgia. Her work has appeared in Pacific Standard, The Big Roundtable, and other publications.

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