Last month, I went to the National Association for the Specialty Food Trade’s 56th annual Summer Fancy Food Show, held at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York. Over three days, more than 24,000 attendees wandered among 2,400 exhibitors hawking thousands of so-called “specialty food and beverage products,” which is a $63 billion industry. In 2009, there were 2,318 new product introductions to the American market — which was actually a bad year. In, 2008, there had been 3,705.

Exhibitors at the Fancy Food Show split into two basic groups. One section consists of booths and rows devoted to food products from a particular region or country. Chile, for instance, seemed to have spent big money to introduce the world to its olive oil, cheese, wine, and the Chilean carica, a cousin of the papaya. Italy, Spain, and France were present, but so were some underdog… More…

As far as the United States Postal Service’s problems go, a dust-up over a stamp probably doesn’t rank very high. But for the Freedom from Religion Foundation (FFRF), the post office’s dire financial straits don’t mean it can just go about issuing stamps of whomever it wants. That’s why the organization — whose focus is maintaining a separation of church and state — last month came out against the Postal Service’s decision to issue a stamp this year honoring Mother Theresa.

FFRF argues that the choice violates the Service’s own ban on stamps and stationary that honor religious individuals. The organization blames “America’s disproportionately powerful Roman Catholic influence,” but a spokesman for the agency told Fox News that the nun is being… More…